1. 19:11 19th Oct 2014

    Notes: 7

    Reblogged from vickynspiration

    vickynspiration:

    North West

     
  2. 21:50 12th Oct 2014

    Notes: 20443

    Reblogged from charleyyraesdivision

    a-wanderlustsoul:

This is an incomplete list of innocent unarmed black persons who were murdered by police officers.
2014: Vonderrick Myers (St. Louis, MO) 2014: Victor White III (Iberia Parish, LA) 2014: Dante Parker (San Bernardino County, CA) 2014: Ezell Ford (Los Angeles, CA) 2014: Michael Brown (Ferguson, MO) 2014: Tyree Woodson (Baltimore, MD) 2014: John Crawford III (Beavercreek, OH) 2014: Eric Garner (New York, NY) 2014: Yvette Smith (Bastrop, TX) 2014: Jordan Baker (Houston, TX) 2013: Barrington Williams (New York, NY) 2013: Carlos Alcis (New York, NY) 2013: Deion Fludd (New York, NY) 2013: Jonathan Ferrell (Bradfield Farms, NC) 2013: Kimani Gray (New York, NY) 2013: Kyam Livingstone (New York, NY) 2013: Larry Eugene Jackson, Jr. (Austin, TX) 2013: Miriam Carey (Washington, DC) 2012: Chavis Carter (Jonesboro, AR) 2012: Dante Price (Dayton, OH) 2012: Duane Brown (New York, NY) 2012: Ervin Jefferson (Atlanta, GA) 2012: Jersey Green (Aurora, IL) 2012: Johnnnie Kamahi Warren (Dotham, AL) 2012: Justin Slipp (New Orleans, LA) 2012: Kendrec McDade (Pasadena, CA) 2012: Malissa Williams (Cleveland, OH) 2012: Nehemiah Dillard (Gainesville, FL) 2012: Ramarley Graham (New York, NY) 2012: Raymond Allen (Galveston, TX) 2012: Rekia Boyd (Chicago, IL) 2012: Reynaldo Cuevas (New York, NY) 2012: Robert Dumas Jr (Cleveland, OH) 2012: Sgt. Manuel Loggins Jr (Orange County, CA) 2012: Shantel Davis (New York, NY) 2012: Sharmel Edwards (Las Vegas, NV) 2012: Shereese Francis (New York, NY) 2012: Tamon Robinson (New York, NY) 2012: Timothy Russell (Cleveland, OH) 2012: Wendell Allen (New Orleans, LA) 2011: Alonzo Ashley (Denver, CO) 2011: Jimmell Cannon (Chicago, IL) 2011: Kenneth Chamberlain (White Plains, NY) 2011: Kenneth Harding (San Francisco, CA) 2011: Raheim Brown (Oakland, CA) 2011: Reginald Doucet (Los Angeles, CA) 2010: Aaron Campbell (Portland, OR) 2010: Aiyana Jones (Detroit, MI) 2010: Danroy Henry (Thornwood, NY) 2010: Derrick Jones (Oakland, CA) 2010: Steven Eugene Washington (Los Angeles, CA) 2009: Kiwane Carrington (Champaign, IL) 2009: Oscar Grant (Oakland, CA) 2009: Shem Walker (New York, NY) 2009: Victor Steen (Pensacola, FL) 2008: Tarika Wilson (Lima, OH) 2007: DeAunta Terrel Farrow (West Memphis, AR) 2006: Sean Bell (New York, NY) 2005: Henry Glover (New Orleans, LA) 2005: James Brisette (New Orleans, LA) 2005: Ronald Madison (New Orleans, LA) 2004: Timothy Stansbury (New York, NY) 2003: Alberta Spruill (New York, NY) 2003: Orlando Barlow (Las Vegas, NV) 2003: Ousmane Zongo (New York, NY) 2001: Timothy Thomas (Cincinnati, OH) 2000: Earl Murray (Dellwood, MO) 2000: Malcolm Ferguson (New York, NY) 2000: Patrick Dorismond (New York, NY) 2000: Prince Jones (Fairfax County, VA) 2000: Ronald Beasley (Dellwood, MO) 1999: Amadou Diallo (New York, NY) 1994: Nicholas Heyward Jr. (New York, NY) 1992: Malice Green (Detroit, MI) 1985: Edmund Perry (New York, NY) 1984: Eleanor Bumpurs (New York, NY) 1983: Michael Stewart (New York, NY) 1981: Ron Settles (Signal Hill, CA) 1979: Eula Love (Los Angeles, CA) 1969: Mark Clark (Chicago, IL) 1969: Fred Hampton (Chicago, IL) 1964: James Powell (New York, NY)
This list was copied from http://abagond.wordpress.com/2014/08/26/a-list-of-unarmed-blacks-killed-by-police/
Written by Julian Abagond.

    a-wanderlustsoul:

    This is an incomplete list of innocent unarmed black persons who were murdered by police officers.

    2014: Vonderrick Myers (St. Louis, MO)
    2014: Victor White III (Iberia Parish, LA)
    2014: Dante Parker (San Bernardino County, CA)
    2014: Ezell Ford (Los Angeles, CA)
    2014: Michael Brown (Ferguson, MO)
    2014: Tyree Woodson (Baltimore, MD)
    2014: John Crawford III (Beavercreek, OH)
    2014: Eric Garner (New York, NY)
    2014: Yvette Smith (Bastrop, TX)
    2014: Jordan Baker (Houston, TX)
    2013: Barrington Williams (New York, NY)
    2013: Carlos Alcis (New York, NY)
    2013: Deion Fludd (New York, NY)
    2013: Jonathan Ferrell (Bradfield Farms, NC)
    2013: Kimani Gray (New York, NY)
    2013: Kyam Livingstone (New York, NY)
    2013: Larry Eugene Jackson, Jr. (Austin, TX)
    2013: Miriam Carey (Washington, DC)
    2012: Chavis Carter (Jonesboro, AR)
    2012: Dante Price (Dayton, OH)
    2012: Duane Brown (New York, NY)
    2012: Ervin Jefferson (Atlanta, GA)
    2012: Jersey Green (Aurora, IL)
    2012: Johnnnie Kamahi Warren (Dotham, AL)
    2012: Justin Slipp (New Orleans, LA)
    2012: Kendrec McDade (Pasadena, CA)
    2012: Malissa Williams (Cleveland, OH)
    2012: Nehemiah Dillard (Gainesville, FL)
    2012: Ramarley Graham (New York, NY)
    2012: Raymond Allen (Galveston, TX)
    2012: Rekia Boyd (Chicago, IL)
    2012: Reynaldo Cuevas (New York, NY)
    2012: Robert Dumas Jr (Cleveland, OH)
    2012: Sgt. Manuel Loggins Jr (Orange County, CA)
    2012: Shantel Davis (New York, NY)
    2012: Sharmel Edwards (Las Vegas, NV)
    2012: Shereese Francis (New York, NY)
    2012: Tamon Robinson (New York, NY)
    2012: Timothy Russell (Cleveland, OH)
    2012: Wendell Allen (New Orleans, LA)
    2011: Alonzo Ashley (Denver, CO)
    2011: Jimmell Cannon (Chicago, IL)
    2011: Kenneth Chamberlain (White Plains, NY)
    2011: Kenneth Harding (San Francisco, CA)
    2011: Raheim Brown (Oakland, CA)
    2011: Reginald Doucet (Los Angeles, CA)
    2010: Aaron Campbell (Portland, OR)
    2010: Aiyana Jones (Detroit, MI)
    2010: Danroy Henry (Thornwood, NY)
    2010: Derrick Jones (Oakland, CA)
    2010: Steven Eugene Washington (Los Angeles, CA)
    2009: Kiwane Carrington (Champaign, IL)
    2009: Oscar Grant (Oakland, CA)
    2009: Shem Walker (New York, NY)
    2009: Victor Steen (Pensacola, FL)
    2008: Tarika Wilson (Lima, OH)
    2007: DeAunta Terrel Farrow (West Memphis, AR)
    2006: Sean Bell (New York, NY)
    2005: Henry Glover (New Orleans, LA)
    2005: James Brisette (New Orleans, LA)
    2005: Ronald Madison (New Orleans, LA)
    2004: Timothy Stansbury (New York, NY)
    2003: Alberta Spruill (New York, NY)
    2003: Orlando Barlow (Las Vegas, NV)
    2003: Ousmane Zongo (New York, NY)
    2001: Timothy Thomas (Cincinnati, OH)
    2000: Earl Murray (Dellwood, MO)
    2000: Malcolm Ferguson (New York, NY)
    2000: Patrick Dorismond (New York, NY)
    2000: Prince Jones (Fairfax County, VA)
    2000: Ronald Beasley (Dellwood, MO)
    1999: Amadou Diallo (New York, NY)
    1994: Nicholas Heyward Jr. (New York, NY)
    1992: Malice Green (Detroit, MI)
    1985: Edmund Perry (New York, NY)
    1984: Eleanor Bumpurs (New York, NY)
    1983: Michael Stewart (New York, NY)
    1981: Ron Settles (Signal Hill, CA)
    1979: Eula Love (Los Angeles, CA)
    1969: Mark Clark (Chicago, IL)
    1969: Fred Hampton (Chicago, IL)
    1964: James Powell (New York, NY)

    This list was copied from
    http://abagond.wordpress.com/2014/08/26/a-list-of-unarmed-blacks-killed-by-police/

    Written by Julian Abagond.

     
  3. 14:45

    Notes: 20035

    Reblogged from definitionpurity

    image: Download

    (Source: anoccomir)

     
  4. 14:44

    Notes: 2590

    Reblogged from ethiopienne

    howtobeterrell:

    we dont speak about pain because thats not what any wants to hear.

    they want machismo. they want sports. they want fatherhood. they want bills paid..they want strength where there isnt any.

    when a black boy stares at the ground something GOT em! some emotion done come and…

     
  5. 14:43

    Notes: 6705

    Reblogged from definitionpurity

    Critics generally don’t associate Black people with ideas. They see marginal people; they see just another story about Black folks. They regard the whole thing as sociologically interesting perhaps, but very parochial. There’s a notion out in the land that there are human beings one writes about, and then there are Black people or Indians or some other marginal group. If you write about the world from that point of view, somehow it is considered lesser. We are people, not aliens. We live, we love, and we die.
    — Toni Morrison (via blackcontemporaryart)
     
  6. 14:43

    Notes: 1116

    Reblogged from dion-thesocialist

    mrcheyl:

"Geico for your money, money."
Gold Digger [x]

    mrcheyl:

    "Geico for your money, money."

    Gold Digger [x]

     
  7. 14:43

    Notes: 3032

    Reblogged from thevegankickboxer

    image: Download

    hypebeast:

Yasiin Bey

    hypebeast:

    Yasiin Bey

     
  8. 17:02 10th Oct 2014

    Notes: 13

    Reblogged from softbutchhardfemmefatale

    softbutchhardfemmefatale:

    I am angry. I am a woman. I am black.

    I am black.
    My grandmother can remember when she was a legal adult who couldn’t vote
    I’m thinking about all the people … within years of my age executed
    People sigh because they think the only violence perpetrated again black people involve bullets.
    Never…

     
  9. 22:47 11th Sep 2014

    Notes: 1559

    Reblogged from rejectedprincesses

    image: Download

    rejectedprincesses:

Mai Bhago: the Sikh Warrior Saint (late 1600s-mid 1700s)
Introducing the eleventh Rejected Princess: Mai Bhago, 18th century Sikh warrior-saint and only survivor of the Battle of Khidrana.
A quick bit of background, since it may be that you, like me, do not know a ton about Sikhs. You probably know that they’re the guys who wear turbans, don’t shave, and consistently get mistaken for Muslim — usually by ignorant morons who are trying to start something. Frustrating as that is, douchebags attacking them for virtually no reason is something that Sikhs have had to live with for the majority of the religion’s existence. Exhibit A: the Mughal Empire.
The Mughals were badasses. Their founder, Babar, had quite the lineage to begin with: descendant of Tamerlane (an Uzbeki warlord known for constructing pyramids out of his enemies’ skulls) on his father’s side and grandson of Genghis Khan on his mother’s. The Mughals continued and refined this legacy. On the one hand they did so militaristically, riding elephants into battle, redefining warfare, and expanding the empire until it encompassed all of present-day India and beyond.
On the other hand, they also advanced literature, culture, and the arts tremendously. They built the Taj Mahal, giant libraries, and had a tremendously multicultural empire. For more info on that, check out Akbar the Great, who — having brought together a huge number of disparate peoples in a surprisingly peaceful, literary, and secular empire, especially for the time — definitely earned the moniker. 
Unfortunately, by the time this story begins, the Mughals were being ruled by Aurangzeb, who was neither peaceful nor understanding. He was particularly aggressive towards the Sikhs, partly because of religious reasons, partly because the Sikhs weren’t down with the caste system. In fact, the Sikhs were egalitarian in general, with women considered equals to men.
Which brings us to Mai Bhago. Sorry for the long intro, I just want you to know what she was up against. 
Mai lived in a peaceful rural town with her parents. She spent a lot of time with her dad, who, in their daddy-daughter hangouts, taught her what any good father should: how to be a devoted Sikh, how to ride a horse, and how to kill anyone who starts shit with you. All of these came in handy just a few years later, when the leader of the Sikh, Guru Gobind Singh Ji, founded the Khalsa — the warrior-saints.
You see, the previous Guru before Gobind Singh Ji — and there were only ever ten of these guys to ever live, with Guru Gobind Singh Ji being number ten — was executed by Aurangzeb when the Guru was nine years old. Rather than capitulating to Aurangzeb and living a quiet life, the Guru ordered his followers to eschew the caste system, forsake their family names, be baptized as warrior-saints, and kick ass for the lord.
Mai Bhago was one of the first to get down on that.
The following years were very difficult on the Sikhs, with the Mughals waging nonstop warfare on the Guru. As tough as it was on him, it was arguably tougher on his warriors, holed up in fortress after fortress, eventually subsisting on nothing but nuts and leaves. After months of this, with heavy hearts, forty of them forsook the religion and left the Khalsa, in order to return to their normal lives.
Mai Bhago was having none of that. Upon hearing about the forty deserters, she rode to every city around and got all of the women to refuse any hospitality to them. She even rounded up a group of women to take up arms in the deserters’ place — telling the forty to either stay behind and look after the children or sack up and fight. Suitably ashamed by this, the forty deserters had a change of heart and decided to rejoin the Guru’s cause.
Just in time, too — because as the forty (plus Mai) were riding back to the Guru, the Mughals were making another assault on his stronghold. The size of the army is difficult to determine from historical records, with the only source I can find claiming the Mughals had ten thousand men, which seems a bit ridiculous. In any event, it is agreed that the Sikhs were massively outnumbered. 
On December 29, 1705, the forty-one Sikhs rushed in to cut off the Mughals anyway. They did several clever things in and leading up to the battle:
1) Positioned themselves in front of the Khirdana reservoir, the only source of water for miles around, and defended it viciously.
2) Laid sheets  across bushes everywhere, giving the appearance of tents — and then hid in nearby bushes, ambushing the Mughals when they started attacking the empty “tents”. 
3) Kicked up a colossal amount of dust, attracting the attention of the retreating Guru — who proceeded to unleash an incessant barrage of arrows from a nearby hill upon the Mughals.
Eventually the Mughals, battered and thirsty, withdrew. All forty of the deserters died in that battle, as did a large number of Mughal soldiers. Mai Bhago was the only Sikh survivor. From there, she became bodyguard to the Guru. She outlived him and later died of old age herself. The Mughal Empire under Aurangzeb’s leadership began a slow decline and died out a bit over a century later. The Sikh religion continues strong to this day. Mai Bhago’s spear and gun can still be found in Sikh museums, and her house has been converted into a Gurudwara (a Sikh place of worship). 
And lastly: although best known by the name Mai Bhago, technically her name, after converting to Khalsa, was Mai Bhag Kaur — Kaur being a surname all female Khalsa take, meaning, literally, “princess.”
As an art note: she is depicted here not just wearing the traditional Khalsa clothing, but that of the Nihang, an elite warrior Khalsa sect. This outfit includes a variety of bladed weapons (the Guru was known to have five weapons on him at all times), electric blue robes, steel-wrapped turbans, and steel bangles about the wrist. I am unsure if she was technically Nihang, but for damn sure she had their spirit.
And yes, she is decapitating that guy. Follow the trail of dust to see the arc of her sword. She has her sword and shield on the same arm, up around her shoulder. Realistically, I should have put the shield on her other arm, but hindsight is 20/20.
Lastly: the Mughal being beheaded has period-accurate clothing, although his helmet is one of an infantryman and his outfit is that of a cavalryman. I wanted to be able to see his face.[many thanks for Zaid Hassan and the kindly anonymous Sikh who wrote in with additional information that went into edits on this entry!]

    rejectedprincesses:

    Mai Bhago: the Sikh Warrior Saint (late 1600s-mid 1700s)

    Introducing the eleventh Rejected Princess: Mai Bhago, 18th century Sikh warrior-saint and only survivor of the Battle of Khidrana.

    A quick bit of background, since it may be that you, like me, do not know a ton about Sikhs. You probably know that they’re the guys who wear turbans, don’t shave, and consistently get mistaken for Muslim — usually by ignorant morons who are trying to start something. Frustrating as that is, douchebags attacking them for virtually no reason is something that Sikhs have had to live with for the majority of the religion’s existence. Exhibit A: the Mughal Empire.

    The Mughals were badasses. Their founder, Babar, had quite the lineage to begin with: descendant of Tamerlane (an Uzbeki warlord known for constructing pyramids out of his enemies’ skulls) on his father’s side and grandson of Genghis Khan on his mother’s. The Mughals continued and refined this legacy. On the one hand they did so militaristically, riding elephants into battle, redefining warfare, and expanding the empire until it encompassed all of present-day India and beyond.

    On the other hand, they also advanced literature, culture, and the arts tremendously. They built the Taj Mahal, giant libraries, and had a tremendously multicultural empire. For more info on that, check out Akbar the Great, who — having brought together a huge number of disparate peoples in a surprisingly peaceful, literary, and secular empire, especially for the time — definitely earned the moniker. 

    Unfortunately, by the time this story begins, the Mughals were being ruled by Aurangzeb, who was neither peaceful nor understanding. He was particularly aggressive towards the Sikhs, partly because of religious reasons, partly because the Sikhs weren’t down with the caste system. In fact, the Sikhs were egalitarian in general, with women considered equals to men.

    Which brings us to Mai Bhago. Sorry for the long intro, I just want you to know what she was up against. 

    Mai lived in a peaceful rural town with her parents. She spent a lot of time with her dad, who, in their daddy-daughter hangouts, taught her what any good father should: how to be a devoted Sikh, how to ride a horse, and how to kill anyone who starts shit with you. All of these came in handy just a few years later, when the leader of the Sikh, Guru Gobind Singh Ji, founded the Khalsa — the warrior-saints.

    You see, the previous Guru before Gobind Singh Ji — and there were only ever ten of these guys to ever live, with Guru Gobind Singh Ji being number ten — was executed by Aurangzeb when the Guru was nine years old. Rather than capitulating to Aurangzeb and living a quiet life, the Guru ordered his followers to eschew the caste system, forsake their family names, be baptized as warrior-saints, and kick ass for the lord.

    Mai Bhago was one of the first to get down on that.

    The following years were very difficult on the Sikhs, with the Mughals waging nonstop warfare on the Guru. As tough as it was on him, it was arguably tougher on his warriors, holed up in fortress after fortress, eventually subsisting on nothing but nuts and leaves. After months of this, with heavy hearts, forty of them forsook the religion and left the Khalsa, in order to return to their normal lives.

    Mai Bhago was having none of that. Upon hearing about the forty deserters, she rode to every city around and got all of the women to refuse any hospitality to them. She even rounded up a group of women to take up arms in the deserters’ place — telling the forty to either stay behind and look after the children or sack up and fight. Suitably ashamed by this, the forty deserters had a change of heart and decided to rejoin the Guru’s cause.

    Just in time, too — because as the forty (plus Mai) were riding back to the Guru, the Mughals were making another assault on his stronghold. The size of the army is difficult to determine from historical records, with the only source I can find claiming the Mughals had ten thousand men, which seems a bit ridiculous. In any event, it is agreed that the Sikhs were massively outnumbered. 

    On December 29, 1705, the forty-one Sikhs rushed in to cut off the Mughals anyway. They did several clever things in and leading up to the battle:

    1) Positioned themselves in front of the Khirdana reservoir, the only source of water for miles around, and defended it viciously.

    2) Laid sheets  across bushes everywhere, giving the appearance of tents — and then hid in nearby bushes, ambushing the Mughals when they started attacking the empty “tents”. 

    3) Kicked up a colossal amount of dust, attracting the attention of the retreating Guru — who proceeded to unleash an incessant barrage of arrows from a nearby hill upon the Mughals.

    Eventually the Mughals, battered and thirsty, withdrew. All forty of the deserters died in that battle, as did a large number of Mughal soldiers. Mai Bhago was the only Sikh survivor. From there, she became bodyguard to the Guru. She outlived him and later died of old age herself. The Mughal Empire under Aurangzeb’s leadership began a slow decline and died out a bit over a century later. The Sikh religion continues strong to this day. Mai Bhago’s spear and gun can still be found in Sikh museums, and her house has been converted into a Gurudwara (a Sikh place of worship)

    And lastly: although best known by the name Mai Bhago, technically her name, after converting to Khalsa, was Mai Bhag Kaur — Kaur being a surname all female Khalsa take, meaning, literally, “princess.”

    As an art note: she is depicted here not just wearing the traditional Khalsa clothing, but that of the Nihang, an elite warrior Khalsa sect. This outfit includes a variety of bladed weapons (the Guru was known to have five weapons on him at all times), electric blue robes, steel-wrapped turbans, and steel bangles about the wrist. I am unsure if she was technically Nihang, but for damn sure she had their spirit.

    And yes, she is decapitating that guy. Follow the trail of dust to see the arc of her sword. She has her sword and shield on the same arm, up around her shoulder. Realistically, I should have put the shield on her other arm, but hindsight is 20/20.

    Lastly: the Mughal being beheaded has period-accurate clothing, although his helmet is one of an infantryman and his outfit is that of a cavalryman. I wanted to be able to see his face.

    [many thanks for Zaid Hassan and the kindly anonymous Sikh who wrote in with additional information that went into edits on this entry!]

     
  10. 18:10 31st Aug 2014

    Notes: 440458

    Reblogged from ruinedchildhood

    (Source: rupelover)

     
  11. 17:52

    Notes: 161389

    Reblogged from fyeahcracker

    image: Download

    jcoleknowsbest:

elizabeth-antoinette:

kinkyturtle:

jcoleknowsbest:

So my facebook friend just posted this pic with this text….


Well, I just witnessed blatant racial injustice with my own eyes. I was getting in my car after exiting a store when a young black man stumbled past me and collapsed against the store wall. When I got out to see if he was okay, a group of white people came rushing over, one of whom was a 20-something white woman who declared in distress, “I ran a red light and hit him with my car!” People immediately assured her that SHE would be okay, meanwhile the young man is writhing in pain on the ground, pants leg torn, tears running down his face. When the police arrived and the young woman explained what happened, it was suggested to her that maybe the light had been yellow and that the young man had “darted out into the street into her path.” I was floored. I said, “But she just SAID she ran the red light and hit him in the intersection!” 





The police officers then led the young woman away and began talking with her privately in low tones. When the paramedics FINALLY got there I was surprised at the hostility they showed towards the young man. One blonde female EMT (shown in the photo) suggested that he couldn’t be THAT hurt if he was able to walk from the place where he was struck to the sidewalk where he finally collapsed. White bystanders commented several times about “What that poor girl must be going through.” I was the only one who commented on what the young man must be going through, what, with his mangled leg and all. I am absolutely positive that in the end “that poor girl” will be absolved of all wrongdoing and be able to go on her merry way. After all, she just ran a red light and slammed her car into the body of some black kid on a bike, right?And people wonder why black people are so angry and want to break shit.
















friendly reminder that studies have shown that white people do not empathize with Black people and we (including medical personel) also think Black people feel less pain

wow, I had almost the exact same thing happen to me once.
Was smashed into while on my bike by an old white woman who ran a stop sign as I rode at full speed with traffic. Busted my leg and totaled my bike… in fact, she was so out of it she kept driving with my bike pinned under her car for a block before people waved her down / honked at her to stop.
Witnesses called the cops while I was lying in the street. I stood up in shock and started yelling “you hit me! I can’t believe you fucking hit me with your car! What the hell is wrong with you!” but could feel I had a concussion and was bleeding from a few spots so I sat down on the curb. The paramedics and cops got there, made sure I wasn’t dead and and the went to comfort the old woman!
Before the cops arrived on the scene the woman was half in a daze, teary-eyed, repeating to witnesses, “I thought she was stopping! I don’t know why, I thought she was stopping! I didn’t mean to hit her!” but after a long period of time spent talking privately with the cops (the sun now just barely starting to set) her story changed to “I didn’t see her! It was dark and she didn’t have lights, I couldn’t see her!”
Then from the cops it was, “you need to calm down, girl” and “if you were really hurt you wouldn’t have stood up so quickly” and “she says you yelled profanities at her… I know you don’t want to be in trouble but that’s what’s going to happen if you’re not careful. That’s harassment you know.” and even though it was full daylight when I was hit, “you know, I noticed you don’t have lights on your bike. That could get you into a lot trouble if you’re not careful.” always a vague, “in trouble if your not careful” in a demeaning tone of voice.
A week or so later the police report came in and held me at fault for biking without proper lights after dark (which they completely fabricated; it was day) and stated the time of the accident as a full hour later to validate that claim. I disputed it and filled a personal suit against the woman for damages. During litigation for my case she was found to be legally blind and her license was revoked, but to this day the original police report still stands saying I verbally assaulted the woman but she chose not to press charges (gee wiz, lucky me) and that I was biking at night without lights.
Any scrap of faith I had left in law enforcement dissolved that day but I am grateful to have walked away with an important lesson and my life intact.

^^^^ wow… smh…

    jcoleknowsbest:

    elizabeth-antoinette:

    kinkyturtle:

    jcoleknowsbest:

    So my facebook friend just posted this pic with this text….

    Well, I just witnessed blatant racial injustice with my own eyes. I was getting in my car after exiting a store when a young black man stumbled past me and collapsed against the store wall. When I got out to see if he was okay, a group of white people came rushing over, one of whom was a 20-something white woman who declared in distress, “I ran a red light and hit him with my car!” People immediately assured her that SHE would be okay, meanwhile the young man is writhing in pain on the ground, pants leg torn, tears running down his face. When the police arrived and the young woman explained what happened, it was suggested to her that maybe the light had been yellow and that the young man had “darted out into the street into her path.” I was floored. I said, “But she just SAID she ran the red light and hit him in the intersection!” 

    The police officers then led the young woman away and began talking with her privately in low tones. When the paramedics FINALLY got there I was surprised at the hostility they showed towards the young man. One blonde female EMT (shown in the photo) suggested that he couldn’t be THAT hurt if he was able to walk from the place where he was struck to the sidewalk where he finally collapsed. White bystanders commented several times about “What that poor girl must be going through.” I was the only one who commented on what the young man must be going through, what, with his mangled leg and all. I am absolutely positive that in the end “that poor girl” will be absolved of all wrongdoing and be able to go on her merry way. After all, she just ran a red light and slammed her car into the body of some black kid on a bike, right?

    And people wonder why black people are so angry and want to break shit.

    friendly reminder that studies have shown that white people do not empathize with Black people and we (including medical personel) also think Black people feel less pain

    wow, I had almost the exact same thing happen to me once.

    Was smashed into while on my bike by an old white woman who ran a stop sign as I rode at full speed with traffic. Busted my leg and totaled my bike… in fact, she was so out of it she kept driving with my bike pinned under her car for a block before people waved her down / honked at her to stop.

    Witnesses called the cops while I was lying in the street. I stood up in shock and started yelling “you hit me! I can’t believe you fucking hit me with your car! What the hell is wrong with you!” but could feel I had a concussion and was bleeding from a few spots so I sat down on the curb. The paramedics and cops got there, made sure I wasn’t dead and and the went to comfort the old woman!

    Before the cops arrived on the scene the woman was half in a daze, teary-eyed, repeating to witnesses, “I thought she was stopping! I don’t know why, I thought she was stopping! I didn’t mean to hit her!” but after a long period of time spent talking privately with the cops (the sun now just barely starting to set) her story changed to “I didn’t see her! It was dark and she didn’t have lights, I couldn’t see her!”

    Then from the cops it was, “you need to calm down, girl” and “if you were really hurt you wouldn’t have stood up so quickly” and “she says you yelled profanities at her… I know you don’t want to be in trouble but that’s what’s going to happen if you’re not careful. That’s harassment you know.” and even though it was full daylight when I was hit, “you know, I noticed you don’t have lights on your bike. That could get you into a lot trouble if you’re not careful.” always a vague, “in trouble if your not careful” in a demeaning tone of voice.

    A week or so later the police report came in and held me at fault for biking without proper lights after dark (which they completely fabricated; it was day) and stated the time of the accident as a full hour later to validate that claim. I disputed it and filled a personal suit against the woman for damages. During litigation for my case she was found to be legally blind and her license was revoked, but to this day the original police report still stands saying I verbally assaulted the woman but she chose not to press charges (gee wiz, lucky me) and that I was biking at night without lights.

    Any scrap of faith I had left in law enforcement dissolved that day but I am grateful to have walked away with an important lesson and my life intact.

    ^^^^ wow… smh…

     
  12. 17:50

    Notes: 67

    Reblogged from afro-syntric

    (Source: naturalbelle)

     
  13. 17:49

    Notes: 20695

    Reblogged from afro-syntric

    afro-syntric:

    naturee-feels:

    blxk-badu:

    bellecosby:

    youngblackandvegan:

    grapejellyking:

    crashyourcrew:

    They using lasers now?

    cleeaaannn

    art

    the game is changing at an alarming rate 

    Black men have the best haircuts Idc

    But for real ART

    this is why hair cuts be cost in like 40 dollars

    (Source: cozyqueen)

     
  14. 17:49

    Notes: 8056

    Reblogged from afro-syntric

    Saying people of color are obsessed with race is like saying that someone is obsessed with swimming when they’re drowning.
    — Hari Kondabolu  (via jakeenglish)

    (Source: arabellesicardi)

     
  15. 17:49

    Notes: 542

    Reblogged from afrodesiacworldwide